Pregnancy and desire, and are bigger breasts best? 16 June 2015

Tuesday, June 16, 2015 Rob 3 Comments

We know that pregnant women get cravings for unusual foods, but does pregnancy also affect what women desire in a man? We also look at a new experiment that shows once and for all whether men prefer larger or smaller breasts. You'll be surprised by the results!

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Are Bigger Breasts Best?
Pregnancy and Desire

New research indicates that women's desires change when they are pregnant.

The articles covered in the show:

Dixson, B. J., Duncan, M., & Dixson, A. F. (in press). The role of breast size and areolar pigmentation in perceptions of women’s sexual attractiveness, reproductive health, sexual maturity, maternal nurturing abilities, and age. Archives of Sexual Behavior. Read summary

Limoncin, E., Ciocca, G., Gravina, G. L., Carosa, E., Mollaioli, D., Cellerino, A., et al. (in press). Pregnant women's preferences for men's faces differ significantly from nonpregnant women. The Journal of Sexual Medicine. Read summary

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Isn't breast pertness more important than size? Size is nice but there's something striking about a pair of boobs that are so pert and firm that they don't need any support. Did the experimenters vary pertness?

Anonymous said...

LOL those boob pictures on your medium blog don't look very realistic. The small ones actually look a bit droopy so it's not really a fair test.

Rob said...

First commenter: You're probably right that there are lots of variables that could be included. Pertness would be a cue to youthfulness, and worthwhile looking at. I mean studying!

Second commenter: I agree it's not a perfect manipulation. I think the researchers took the same picture and enlarged/shrunk the breasts with Photoshop. I don't think they look all THAT bad, but they're not as perfect as they could be. Having said that, a lot of research on bodies is done with line drawn cartoons, so it's good when researchers make an effort to produce stimuli that are photorealistic.